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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Stress, reactivity, and cardiovascular disease found in the catalog.

Stress, reactivity, and cardiovascular disease

Stress, reactivity, and cardiovascular disease

proceedings of the working conference

  • 235 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health in [Bethesda, Md.?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cardiovascular system -- Diseases -- Psychosomatic aspects -- Congresses.,
  • Stress (Physiology) -- Congresses.,
  • Stress (Psychology) -- Congresses.,
  • Cardiovascular system -- Diseases -- Risk factors -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementco-sponsored by The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ... [et al.] ; editors, Stephen M. Weiss ... [et al.].
    SeriesNIH publication ;, no. 84-2698, DHHS publication ;, no. (NIH) 84-2698.
    ContributionsWeiss, Stephen M., National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute., National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC669 .S83 1984
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 253 p. :
    Number of Pages253
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2663447M
    LC Control Number85600822

      Psychological stress is thought to contribute to the cardiovascular disease process at several stages, including the long-term development of coronary heart disease and Cited by: Abstract Objective: To examine cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between chronic life stress, cardiovascular reactivity, and a marker of subclinical cardiovascular disease in a multiethnic sample of adolescents. Methods: Participants were healthy adolescents who completed self-report measures of chronic negative life stress as well as assessments of heart rate and blood.

    Wiley Series on Health Psychology/Behavioral Medicine: Handbook of Stress, Reactivity, and Cardiovascular Disease 6 (, Hardcover). People experiencing depression, anxiety, stress, and even PTSD over a long period of time may experience certain physiologic effects on the body, such as increased cardiac reactivity (e.g., increased heart rate and blood pressure), reduced blood flow to the heart, and heightened levels of cortisol.

    Managing stress is a good idea for your overall health, and researchers are currently studying whether managing stress is effective for heart disease. A few studies have examined how well treatment or therapies work in reducing the effects of stress on cardiovascular disease. Depression is linked to heart disease, and it can be treated. If you're finding it hard to shift your way of handling stress, take a stress management class, read a book on managing stress, or.


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Stress, reactivity, and cardiovascular disease Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cardiovascular Reactivity to Psychological Stress and Disease (Apa Science Volumes) Hardcover – May 1, by Jim Blascovich (Author)Author: Jim Blascovich. Handbook of stress, reactivity, and cardiovascular disease.

New York: Wiley, © (OCoLC) Online version: Handbook of stress, reactivity, and cardiovascular disease. New York: Stress, © (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors /. Handbook of Stress, Reactivity, and Cardiovascular Disease (Wiley Series on Health Psychology/Behavioral Medicine) 1st Edition.

Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days. Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days. This book is an articulate, concise, contemporary introduction to the study of important variables underlying cardiovascular reactivity.

Its strength is in the combination of a scholarly but nonpedantic approach to cardiovascular psychophysiology and a solid understanding of be­ havioral medicine approaches to Brand: Springer US. This chapter will compare and discuss research on both high and low cardiovascular responses to psychological stress.

Exaggerated reactions are associated with the development of hypertension. This book is an articulate, concise, contemporary introduction to the study of important variables underlying cardiovascular reactivity.

Its strength is in the combination of a scholarly but nonpedantic approach to cardiovascular psychophysiology and a solid understanding of be­ havioral medicine approaches to the study of hypertension.

Our systematic review provides substrate for a “bidirectional multi-system reactivity hypothesis” that the magnitude (both exaggerated and blunted) of the response to acute psychological stress (both SAM system and HPA axis) in healthy adults is related to future health and disease outcomes (both physical and mental).Author: Anne I.

Turner, Nina Smyth, Sarah J. Hall, Susan J. Torres, Mais Hussein, Sisitha U. Jayasinghe, Sis. The relevance of this stress reactivity to long-term health and disease outcomes is of great importance. We examined prospective studies in apparently healthy adults to test the hypothesis that the magnitude of the response to acute psychological stress in healthy adults is related to future health and disease Author: Anne I.

Turner, Nina Smyth, Sarah J. Hall, Susan J. Torres, Mais Hussein, Sisitha U. Jayasinghe, Sis. Clear evidence now links stress induced disorders such as PTSD to a higher risk of CVD Well established links now exist between mood disorders such as depression and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease,1 and a large but somewhat contentious literature links anxiety disorders with cardiovascular disease In contrast, data on the associations between other psychiatric disorders Author: Simon L Bacon.

The relationship between psychological stress and cardiovascular reactivity has long been suggested as an explanation for the association between psychological stress and by: To examine the effect of chronic life stress and cardiovascular reactivity on subclinical cardiovascular disease, IMT was regressed on Time 2 chronic stress and reactivity, adjusting for covariates.

Repeated-measures ANOVAs were conducted to determine whether chronic life stress and cardiovascular reactivity changed significantly from Time 1 to Time by: Cardiovascular reactivity research examines the alterations in cardiovascular activity that occur in response to environmental circumstances considered to be stressful.

These circumstances are often discrete, identifiable stressors (such as short experimental tasks), but they can also be more long-lasting (such as a period of hours spent at work).Cited by: 1. For researchers and specialists in health psychology, behavioral medicine, or psychophysiology, Cardiovascular Reactivity will be an essential reference on correlations between psychological stress and disease.

This softcover edition is a re-release of the hardcover :   The goal of Stress, Coping, and Cardiovascular Disease is to provide a solid empirical foundation on the relationship between stress and cardiovascular disease so as to stimulate further research into the pathophysiology and treatment of the leading cause of death in industrialized by: Introduction.

Chronic psychological stress is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In addition, acute psychological stress is asssociated with factors that explain the development of atherosclerosis; endothelial dysfunction, inflammatory reactivity and oxidative by: texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection.

Books to Borrow. Top Full text of "Stress, reactivity, and cardiovascular disease: proceedings of the working conference" See other formats. Book Description. The latest volume in the series based on the Annual Stress and Coping Symposia held at the University of Miami, Drs.

McCabe, Schneiderman, Field, and Wellens bring together an outstanding group of researchers to examine the relationship between bio-behavioral and social factors and heart disease. These cardiovascular indices of coronary health may also be used as treatment variables within psychological interventions for stress, anxiety, and depression.

This paper describes the links that HRR and HRV make between common “psychological” presenting problems of stress, anxiety, and depression, and the more life‐threatening by: Jim Blascovich and Edward S. Katkin. The study of cardiovascular reactivity to psychological stress is motivated, in part, by its potential etiological significance for the relationship between individual differences in the experience of stress and cardiovascular disease, particularly coronary heart disease (CHD) and hypertension (cf.

Matthews et al., ). Stress, Coping, and Cardiovascular Disease is part of a continuing series of volumes based on the annual University of Miami Symposia on Stress and Coping. These symposia focus on important contemporary research topics related to the basic physiological mechanisms, psychosocial factors, developmental aspects, and mental health factors in the relationship between stress and disease.

Get this from a library! Stress, reactivity, and cardiovascular disease: proceedings of the working conference. [Stephen M Weiss; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.; National Institutes of.

David S Goldstein Oxford University Press, pounds sterling60, pp ISBN 0 19 7 “Stress is like obscenity. I cannot define it, but I know it when I see it.” The opening quote of David Goldstein's book proves remarkably apposite for a text that draws both its literary and scientific strength from its scholarly mix of quotations and descriptions of catecholamine biology in Cited by: 1.This book is an articulate, concise, contemporary introduction to the study of important variables underlying cardiovascular reactivity.

Its strength is in the combination of a scholarly but nonpedantic approach to cardiovascular psychophysiology and a solid understanding of be havioral medicine approaches to the study of hypertension.5/5(1).